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"Vulgarizing American Children": Navigating Respectability and Commercial Appeal in Early Newspaper Comics

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dc.contributor.advisor Petrik, Paula
dc.contributor.author Suiter III, Ralph D.
dc.creator Suiter III, Ralph D.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-28T10:20:49Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-28T10:20:49Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1920/10409
dc.description.abstract Between the first appearance of the Sunday newspaper comic supplement in 1895 and the early 1920s, the status of the comic supplement in the field of cultural production was being questioned and navigated by publishers, editors, cartoonists, and the reading public. Looking at the first years of the comic supplements, this dissertation argues that the early supplements, as emulations of comic weekly magazines such as Puck and Life, may have been an attempt to make the yellow journals more palatable to a middle-class audience. This attempt became moot after the “second moral war,” a campaign against the yellow journals undertaken by more “respectable” newspapers in 1897, which made comics a metonym for yellow journalism.
dc.format.extent 246 pages
dc.language.iso en
dc.rights Copyright 2016 Ralph D. Suiter III
dc.subject American history en_US
dc.subject Armory Show en_US
dc.subject Comics en_US
dc.subject Moral Panics en_US
dc.subject Newspaper Comics en_US
dc.subject Progressive Era Women's Groups en_US
dc.subject Yellow Journalism en_US
dc.title "Vulgarizing American Children": Navigating Respectability and Commercial Appeal in Early Newspaper Comics
dc.type Dissertation
thesis.degree.level Ph.D.
thesis.degree.discipline History
thesis.degree.grantor George Mason University


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