Mason Archival Repository Service

Social Preferences, Learning, and the Dynamics of Cooperation in Networked Societies: A Dialogue Between Experimental and Computational Approaches

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Axtell, Robert L
dc.contributor.author Cotla, Chenna Reddy
dc.creator Cotla, Chenna Reddy
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-28T10:22:15Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-28T10:22:15Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1920/10442
dc.description.abstract In this dissertation, I empirically investigate cooperative behavior in networks using the framework of network public goods games. To do so, I use a dialogue between behavioral experiments and agent-based models. I design and conduct behavioral experiments to generate data to construct boundedly rational agents that behave like humans and reproduce stylized facts in public goods environments. The human-like agents are deployed in a small-scale agent-based model to make novel quantitative predictions that can be statistically tested using a new set of behavioral experiments. This ensures that the behavioral specification of agents carries predictive value so that quantitative predictions made using it can be reproduced with human subject experiments. The high fidelity agent-based model is then extended to study the dynamics cooperation in networked environments. The dissertation is organized into three chapters.
dc.format.extent 234 pages
dc.language.iso en
dc.rights Copyright 2016 Chenna Reddy Cotla
dc.subject Economics en_US
dc.subject Agent-Based Modeling en_US
dc.subject Cooperation en_US
dc.subject Incentivized Experiments en_US
dc.subject Learning en_US
dc.subject Networks en_US
dc.subject Social Preferences en_US
dc.title Social Preferences, Learning, and the Dynamics of Cooperation in Networked Societies: A Dialogue Between Experimental and Computational Approaches
dc.type Dissertation
thesis.degree.level Ph.D.
thesis.degree.discipline Computational Social Sciences
thesis.degree.grantor George Mason University


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study
    Seeking to understand the human mind: how it came to be, how it relates to the electrochemical activities of networks of nerve cells in the brain, how it can be modeled on computers, and how it is a vital component of what we are.

Show simple item record

Search MARS


Browse

My Account

Statistics