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Browsing Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter School for Peace and Conflict Resolution by Title

Browsing Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter School for Peace and Conflict Resolution by Title

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  • School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, 2014-12)
    S-CAR News, Volume 8, Issues 1-8
  • Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, 2015-12)
    S-CAR News, Volume 9, Issues 1-4; Volume 10, Issues 1-3
  • School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution; School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, 2016-12)
    S-CAR News, Volume 10, Issues 4-6; Volume 11, Issues 1-3
  • School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, 2017-12)
    S-CAR News, Volume 11, Issues 4-5
  • Rothbart, Daniel (Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University, 2006-09-18)
  • Paczynska, Agnieszka (Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University, 2006-09-18)
  • Clements, Kevin P (School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, 2002-12)
    “If I have a text for tonight it comes from that American exponent of nonviolence, Martin Luther King Jr. It was he who said: ‘Wars are poor chisels for carving out peaceful tomorrows.’ The challenge facing all of us tonight ...
  • Pruitt, Dean G. (School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, 2005)
    Ripeness theory, in its most common version, concerns the psychological states that encourage parties who are involved in severe conflict to move into negotiation—either bilateral or mediated. This monograph first summarizes ...
  • Mitchell, Christopher (School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, 1990-10-29)
    “Moves intended to initiate de-escalation and begin a peace process are often difficult to make and even more difficult to identify unambiguously. Two examples from recent Anglo-Argentine relations provide a basis for ...
  • Cobb, Sarah (School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, 2004)
    This paper attempts to provide a normative basis for mediation that will hopefully complicate our ethical understanding of this practice. Specifically, I will elaborate a critique of ‘recognition,’ following Oliver (2000), ...

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