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Conflict Resolution Education: A Case Study Analysis

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dc.contributor.author Kennedy, Timothy G.
dc.creator Kennedy, Timothy G.
dc.date 2010-08-27
dc.date.accessioned 2010-10-29T15:38:10Z
dc.date.available NO_RESTRICTION en_US
dc.date.available 2010-10-29T15:38:10Z
dc.date.issued 2010-10-29
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1920/6004
dc.description.abstract Research focusing on conflict resolution education (CRE) programs has established causal links between academic achievement and students who have received conflict resolution training in school. Conflict resolution education programs help students develop toolkits of conflict resolution skills such as communication, active listening, and problem solving skills in order to develop integrative approaches to conflict resolution based on cooperative negotiation and mediation procedures, as well as develop more positive attitudes towards conflict. Not only will implementation of such programs lead to higher academic achievement but will help students deal with conflict, both in and out of school, in a more positive and constructive manner. The purpose of this research study is to understand how three specific conflict resolution education programs came into existence, how they were designed and implemented, and how they have been evaluated and sustained. With respect to the overall field of conflict resolution education, the goal will be to shed light on how and why conflict resolution education came to be an important component of these three educational settings so as to provide insight into how the practice of conflict resolution education can be adapted to fit the needs of other educational institutions. Ultimately, the goal will be to provide justification for the expansion of conflict resolution education throughout the education sector, both domestically and globally, and to establish best practices in the design and implementation of new programs. Analysis of the three programs will be based on the following central themes: • Understanding the theory behind the conception of the program. • Seeking to understand the development and implementation of the programs. • Learning how the programs have been evaluated and sustained. • Assessing how effective the programs have been in terms of the impact they might have made on the overall school climate and the extent to which correlations can be drawn between the operation of the programs and dependent variables such as academic achievement, communication skills, discipline referrals, suspension rates, school violence, and attendance/drop out rates.
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.subject conflict resolution education en_US
dc.subject peer mediation en_US
dc.subject Conflict resolution en_US
dc.subject academic achievement en_US
dc.subject negotiation en_US
dc.subject social and emotional learning en_US
dc.title Conflict Resolution Education: A Case Study Analysis en_US
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.name M.S. Conflict Analysis and Resolution en_US
thesis.degree.level Master's en
thesis.degree.discipline Conflict Analysis and Resolution en
thesis.degree.grantor George Mason University en


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