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dc.contributor.author Symoniak, Jason D.
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-29T18:42:41Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-29T18:42:41Z
dc.date.issued 2010-12
dc.identifier.issn 1947-2633
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1920/6565
dc.description.abstract In 1989, John Williamson outlined a set of desirable economic reforms targeted at developing countries that he deemed broadly supported by policymakers in Washington. Dubbed the “Washington Consensus”, it addressed economic policy instruments perceived by those in Washington to be important to both the growth of developing countries and their ability to secure financial support and investment. Over the course of two decades, these policy instruments have been put to the test. In light of debates, disputes, and domestic and international economic crises, it is time to revisit, revise, and restate the importance of all ten policy instruments
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.subject Washington Consensus en_US
dc.subject Economic Policy en_US
dc.title The Washington Consensus en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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