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Tensions Not Unlike that Produced by a Mixed Marriage: Daniel Marshall and Catholic Challenges to Anti-Misecegenation Statutes

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dc.contributor.author Leon, Sharon
dc.date.accessioned 2013-03-19T19:42:27Z
dc.date.available 2013-03-19T19:42:27Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.citation Sharon M. Leon, “Tensions Not Unlike that Produced by a Mixed Marriage: Daniel Marshall and Catholic Challenges to Anti-Misecegenation Statutes,” U.S. Catholic Historian 26, no. 4 (2008) 27-44. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1920/8045
dc.description.abstract In 1948, the California Supreme Court declared the state’s anti-miscegenation statute unconstitutional. Twenty years before the U.S. Supreme Court came to the same conclusion in Loving v. Virginia, Daniel Marshall argued that his clients deserved the right to marry in California in part based on the fact that their church had no objections. Andrea Perez and Sylvester Davis were Catholics, and their attorney was a leading member of the Los Angeles chapter of the Catholic Interracial Council. The story of their efforts to overturn the anti-miscegenation statute sheds light on Catholic thinking about religious and racial differences with respect to marriage and the ways that that thinking interfaces with contemporary attitudes about race in a pluralistic American culture.
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Catholic University of America Press en_US
dc.subject Catholic en_US
dc.subject History en_US
dc.title Tensions Not Unlike that Produced by a Mixed Marriage: Daniel Marshall and Catholic Challenges to Anti-Misecegenation Statutes en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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